Qantas CEO Alan Joyce announced as patron of workplace diversity program

Alan Joyce, the openly gay CEO of Australian airline company Qantas has just been announced as the co-patron of national LGBTI workplace inclusion program, Pride in Diversity .
Joyce was announced today as co-patron of the program. He will share the role with the Chief Executive of the Business Council of Australia, Jennifer Westacott.
Joyce will replace the founding patron of the program former High Court Justice, the Honourable Michael Kirby. He announced he would step down after eight years in the role.
The not for profit program is run by LGBTI organization, ACON.
Its president, Justin Koonin said Joyce would bring a wealth of experience from the corporate sector into the role.
‘Even with the successful passage of marriage equality legislation in 2017, there is still a tremendous amount of work to do, and it is important that in all aspects of Australian life we have outstanding leaders, advocates and allies – including of course within Australia’s major business, governmental and educational institutions,’ Koonin said.
Pride in Diversity
Pride in Diversity is an employer support program for LGBTI workplace inclusion. It publishes the Australian Workplace Equality Index (AWEI), the country’s national benchmarking instrument for LGBTI workplace inclusion. The AWEI helps determine who the Top Employers are for LGBTI people.
‘Companies have so much to gain when employees bring their whole selves to their job, but I’ve heard too many stories from people who feel they have to devote a lot of energy to hiding a big part of their identity,’ Joyce said.
‘The marriage equality result shows us that Australia really does believe in a fair go for all, so we need to take that message to more parts of the community.’
Joyce recently topped a list of global LGBTI executives for his role in aviation , but also for being a vocal advocate for marriage equality during Australia’s postal survey on the issue.
During the postal survey Joyce donated AU$1 million (US$802,298) of his own money to the ‘Yes’ campaign.
 



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